News Zone

August 2017 Newsletter 04 Aug 2017 - August 2017 Newsletter - Wines and Spirits Geographical Indications now registrable in New Zealand - New Zealand Copyright Act Review Underway - The Contract and Commercial Law Act 2017 - Know your Rights - Zone Welcomes New Staff - Zone will be attending IPSANZ Annual Conference
Zone Law April 2017 Newsletter 18 Apr 2017 - Zone Law April 2017 Newsletter INTA 2017 INTA (International Trade Mark Association) will be held in Barcelona, Spain in May this year. The Zone IP and Zone Law team are delighted to be attending this Annual Conference. The team will be hosting a Cocktail Function at this year’s event and will look forward to catching up with clients and associates from around the world.
November newsletter Issue 16 Nov 2016 - November newsletter Issue • IPONZ closed due to Earthquake • What's in a Name • New Zealand Trade Mark Scam – Payments Made to New Zealand Trade Mark Owners • Trade Marks and Social Media
New IP Australia fees 28 Sep 2016 - New IP Australia fees Trade mark fees are being overhauled in Australia. New fees for Australian trade mark applications and renewals will come into effect on 10 October 2016, while new fees for WIPO import applications and renewals take effect on 28 October 2016.
Newsletter May 2016 16 May 2016 - Newsletter May 2016 A recent Trade Mark decision in China highlights the need for brand owners to secure their trade marks if they are entering the Chinese market. A Chinese company, Xintong Tiandi Technology (Beijing) Co., Ltd. filed the trade mark IPHONE in 2007 in relation to leather products, such as wallets and phone cases. This was the year the first iPhones went on sale.
Important Law Changes to date in 2016 01 Apr 2016 - Important Law Changes to date in 2016 Health and Safety Law Changes On 4 April 2016, the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 (“the Act”) comes into force. The Act contains changes for all businesses, regardless of size or industry. We suggest that if you are in business, you review health and safety processes to ensure they are compliant with your responsibilities under the Act.
Scam letters continue to do the rounds 01 Apr 2016 - Scam letters continue to do the rounds There has been a recent surge in telephone calls and emails from clients and members of the public who have received fake letters regarding their trade marks.
Court ruling and MPI actions against NZ Honey trademark set a dangerous ‘nanny state’ precedent 24 Mar 2016 - Court ruling and MPI actions against NZ Honey trademark set a dangerous ‘nanny state’ precedent A recent High Court ruling barring New Zealand Honey International from using their brand names Manuka Doctor and Manuka Pharm on honey has serious implications for potentially thousands of New Zealand businesses and product names.
New Zealand to introduce mechanism for protection of Geographical Indications 02 Dec 2015 - New Zealand to introduce mechanism for protection of Geographical Indications What is a Geographical Indication? A geographical indication (GI) is a name or sign that guarantees a product comes from a particular location and possesses certain qualities due to that origin. Examples of well-known GIs include “Champagne” for wine and “Roquefort” for cheese.
Making trade mark law accessible and affordable to everyone 01 Dec 2015 - Making trade mark law accessible and affordable to everyone Just over seven years ago Zone Law founder, Theodore Doucas – recognising that high legal costs and a time consuming trademark application process were stifling the growth of New Zealand companies – set out to make access to trade mark law easier, faster and cheaper using all the smarts the digital age could offer.
New flag designs may pose problems for companies with existing silver fern trademarks 05 Oct 2015 - New flag designs may pose problems for companies with existing silver fern trademarks New Zealand’s proposed new flag designs – especially the single black and white silver fern – could spell problems for companies with existing, but similar designs, that are registered trade marks.
Buying .sucks domains a ridiculous exercise in futility for NZ companies 01 Jul 2015 - Buying .sucks domains a ridiculous exercise in futility for NZ companies Buying up new domain names like .sucks to protect your name or brand is about as useful as buying up snowflakes to stop it snowing. The .sucks domain is one of the over 600 new domains created since 2012 in a broad expansion of the Internet naming system.
New Zealand law losing online trade mark wars? 07 Apr 2015 - New Zealand law losing online trade mark wars? The diminishing ability of traditional legal channels to protect businesses from brand jacking and dilution of trade marks online in New Zealand, means business leaders might need to start relying less on the law and more on smarter commercial decisions to protect their brand investments.
Social media power trumping trademark rights 15 Oct 2014 - Social media power trumping trademark rights Recent international events where trademark law has come off second best against social media should serve as a caution to New Zealand companies to tread carefully when enforcing their rights.
China Amends Trade Mark Law 08 Oct 2014 - China Amends Trade Mark Law In August 2013, China’s Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, the country’s highest legislative body, made their third amendment to China’s Trademark Law. The amendment, which comes into effect on May 1, 2014, makes a number of important changes for those looking to register their trade marks in China.
Battle of the Bottle – the importance of filing the right mark for the job 07 Oct 2014 - Battle of the Bottle – the importance of filing the right mark for the job The cold war between the world’s leading soft drinks manufacturers, Coca-Cola and Pepsi, fizzed over as the two soft-drink giants went to court over alleged trade mark infringement by Pepsi.
Court’s decision on Australian company rights should concern Kiwis 06 Oct 2014 - Court’s decision on Australian company rights should concern Kiwis A recent High Court judgement about the intellectual property rights of Australian companies in New Zealand should be a real cause for concern to New Zealand companies.
Patents bill passes its 3rd reading 05 Oct 2014 - Patents bill passes its 3rd reading After many years in the making, the Patents Bill will now become law after passing its 3rd and final reading in Parliament on 28 August 2013. The bill overhauls the archaic Patents Act 1953, for the most part aligning New Zealand more closely with overseas practice and our major trading partners.
Release of Georgie Pies and Unilever’s loss highlights ‘use it or lose it’ rule for trademarks 04 Oct 2014 - Release of Georgie Pies and Unilever’s loss highlights ‘use it or lose it’ rule for trademarks The recent release of iconic Georgie Pie pies by McDonalds, and a trade mark defeat for Unilever in the New Zealand High Court, both highlight the need for businesses to ‘use it or lose it’ when it comes to trade mark protection.
Open season on trademarks after Google withdraws protection 03 Oct 2014 - Open season on trademarks after Google withdraws protection The Internet has become a riskier place for New Zealand companies trying to protect their brand after Google announced it will no longer monitor or restrict the sale of AdWords in response to trade mark complaints.
Companies Office registration does not protect company names, brands or logos 02 Oct 2014 - Companies Office registration does not protect company names, brands or logos The most common mistake Kiwi business owners make is thinking that their brand name is protected because the New Zealand Companies Office (Companies Office) allowed them to register the company.
International Trade Marks - Madrid Protocol 01 Oct 2014 - International Trade Marks - Madrid Protocol Trade marks are jurisdictional. Therefore, New Zealand companies wishing to protect their trade marks overseas must file an application in each of the countries in which they trade. However, many New Zealand businesses over the years have found the cost of registering a trade mark overseas prohibitive. By not registering their trade mark overseas, this may leave their businesses at risk of falling foul of the trademark laws of that country.